Speaker: Matthew W. Bates

  • Thomas McCall – Analytic Christology and the Theological Interpretation of the New Testament

    If you like conversations that sit on the awkward fence between systematic theology and biblical studies, this episode is for you. Tom McCall's wide-ranging expertise clarifies the limits of an apocalyptic reading of Galatians 2:20 ("I have been crucified with Christ, and I no longer live..."), the pistis Christou debate, social trinitarianism, and discussions in scholarship sparked by Karl Barth pertaining to the incarnation. Co-hosted by Matt Bates and Chris Tilling.

  • Between Doubt and Dogmatism – Joshua McNall

    Tired of gurus that have all the answers? Or those so zealous for deconstruction that the have none? We need a recalibrated theological imagination that can fuel faithful loyalty. In this wide-ranging interview featuring his new book Perhaps, Joshua McNall shows us that when Scripture and great literature are allowed to resonate, we are able to move beyond rigid dogmatism and endless doubt. Co-hosted by Matt Bates.

  • Scot McKnight and Hans Boersma – Things I Wish You Knew

    Scot McKnight and Hans Boersma have a spirited exchange in their Five Things books--and it becomes even more lively as they extend the conversation for OnScript. After a drink or two, where would the theologian Boersma still want to press the biblical scholar McKnight? A wide-ranging dialogue on the proper interfacing of Scripture, tradition, and philosophical framework, co-hosted by Matthew Bates and Erin Heim - that is, when they could get a word in edgewise.

  • Alister McGrath – Doctrine of Justification

    How has the church's understanding of salvation grown and shifted over time? What are common misunderstandings that Catholics and Protestants have about salvation? How has this impacted the church? And what is the future of justification as that connects to ecumenical efforts? Eminent church historian Alister McGrath (University of Oxford) has been research and writing about the history of salvation in the church for over 40 years. In light of his freshly revised monograph, Iustitia Dei, McGrath leads us on a tour of the history of the Christian doctrine. Co-hosted by Matthew W. Bates.

  • Special Announcement!

    OnScript is pleased to announce that we have a new theology co-host. Please welcome Jules Martínez-Olivieri to the podcast!

  • Julien C. H. Smith – Paul and the Good Life

    Episode: What happens when Dallas Willard, Wendell Berry, and James K. A. Smith walk into a bar to discuss Paul and the Good Life? Join Julien C. H. Smith and […]

  • Richard Rice – The Future of Open Theism

    Episode: The upstart theological movement called open theism is coming of age. It’s time to reassess its possibilities, promises, and perils. One of the founders of open theism, Richard Rice, […]

  • Kevin Grasso – Christ-Faith in Paul’s Letters

    The debate as to whether the phrase πίστiς Χριστοῦ should be translated as "faith in Christ" (objective genitive) or the faithfulness of the Christ (subjective genitive) seems interminable. In an important new journal article, Kevin Grasso claims to have entirely disproven the viability of the objective genitive as traditionally understood. Meanwhile, he claims that a third-way solution ("Christ-faith" is better evidenced grammatically, while it also makes good theological sense of aspects of the subjective interpretation.

  • Jeannine Brown – The Gospels as Stories

    Episode: We're back with our fourth annual live-recorded podcast episode at Nashotah House Theological Seminary! Dr. Jeannine Brown joined us this year to discuss her book The Gospels as Stories(Baker Academic, 2020). Tune in for conversation about the importance of narrative thinking, intertextuality, and women among the disciples, and for a very special speed round. 

  • R. Alan Streett – Caesar and the Sacrament

    Was baptism spiritual, political, or both? And to what degree was baptism seen as saving in the New Testament and early Christianity? Why? In his provocative and important new book Caesar and the Sacrament, R. Alan Streett shows that baptism was a politically subversive action that involved swearing an oath of allegiance to a new king. Co-hosted by Matt Bates.

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